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  1. Description of the clinical practice of advanced practice nurses in family-centered early intervention in two rural settings.

    Article - En anglais

    The purpose of this study was to describe the scope of clinical practice of advanced practice nurses who were involved in a project designed to increase access of families with at-risk and disabled young children, newborn to 3 years of age, to early intervention services in rural Washington State.

    The findings from this study are based on the retrospective review of records of clients seen by the advanced practice nurses.

    Nursing diagnoses and nursing interventions were assigned to chart recordings.

    The most frequently occurring nursing diagnoses assigned to parents were Altered Parenting, Altered Family Processes, Fear, Noncompliance, and Knowledge Deficit.

    The most frequently occurring nursing diagnoses assigned to children were Impaired Physical Mobility, Impaired Verban Communication, Altered Nutrition :

    • Less than Body Requiremenrs,

    • Sensory-Perceptual Alteration, and Altered Thought Processes,

    • Categories of nursing intervention recorded most frequently were Monitoring,

    • Planning and Information.

    Discussion of findings addresses the roles and reimbursement of advanced practice nurses who provide family-centered early intervention services in rural communities.

    Mots-clés Pascal : Infirmier, Pratique professionnelle, Milieu rural, Milieu familial, Diagnostic, Relation familiale, Santé, Rôle professionnel, Facteur risque, Enfant, Etats Unis, Homme, Amérique du Nord, Amérique

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : Nurse, Professional practice, Rural environment, Family environment, Diagnosis, Familial relation, Health, Occupational role, Risk factor, Child, United States, Human, North America, America

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 95-0087459

    Code Inist : 002B30A05. Création : 09/06/1995.