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  1. Training, experience and interest of general practitioners in travel medicine in New Zealand.

    Article - En anglais


    In New Zealand, general practitioners (GPs) are a major group of travel health advisers.

    This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of training, experience, and interest in travel medicine or related areas, interest in undertaking training in travel medicine and how training might be best delivered.


    Four hundred GPs were randomly selected from the register of the New Zealand Medical Council and sent self-administered questionnaires.

    Two reminders were sent.


    Three hundred and thirty-two (83%) GPs responded and these GPs advised an average of two travelers per week.

    Most GPs (257/282,91%) reported that they had no training in travel medicine/related area.

    Training in travel medicine/related areas was significantly associated with age group (X2=14.09, df=6, p<. 05), with the proportion of GPs with training in travel medicine/related area tending to be higher in the 45-49 and 50-54 years age groups, and also with GP college membership/fellowship (X2=6.39, df=1, p<. 05).

    Forty-one percent (121/298) of respondents stated that they had previous experience working in tropical medicine/developing country.

    There was a significant association between GPs having experience working in tropical medicine/developing countries and training in travel medicine (X2=14.19, df=1, p<. 001) and those who were non-New Zealand graduates (X2=7.84, df=1, p<. 01). (...)

    Mots-clés Pascal : Médecin généraliste, Nouvelle Zélande, Océanie, Enseignement, Connaissance, Médecine tropicale, Enquête, Homme, Voyage, Etude statistique

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : General practitioner, New Zealand, Oceania, Teaching, Knowledge, Tropical medicine, Survey, Human, Travel, Statistical study

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 99-0332455

    Code Inist : 002B30A09. Création : 16/11/1999.