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  1. Deaths attributable to injuries in infants, United States, 1983-1991.

    Article - En anglais

    Objective To describe risk factors for injury death among infants in the United States by the specific external cause of death.

    Methods

    Data were analyzed from the US-linked birth/infant death files for the years 1983-1991.

    Potential risk factors for injury death were identified from birth certificate data and included both maternal and infant factors.

    Injury rates were calculated by external cause of death.

    Characteristics of infants who died from an injury were compared with those of the entire birth cohort.

    The independent effect of potential risk factors was assessed in multivariate analyses using a case-control study design.

    Results

    A total of 10 370 injury deaths were identified over the 9-year study period (29.72/100 000 live births).

    The leading causes of death were homicide, suffocation, motor vehicle crashes, and choking (inhalation of food or objects).

    There was no significant temporal trend in the overall rate of injury death ; however, this was because significant increases in the rates of death from homicide (6.4%/year) and mechanical suffocation (3.7%/year) were offset by decreases in rates of death from fires (-4.7%/year) and choking (-4.6%/year). (...)

    Mots-clés Pascal : Etats Unis, Amérique du Nord, Amérique, Epidémiologie, Evaluation, Traumatisme, Enfant, Homme, Classification, Facteur risque, Mort, Accident circulation, Meurtre, Brûlure, Noyade, Mère, Statut culturel, Ethnie, Age, Etouffement

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : United States, North America, America, Epidemiology, Evaluation, Trauma, Child, Human, Classification, Risk factor, Death, Traffic accident, Murder, Burn, Drowning, Mother, Cultural status, Ethnic group, Age

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 99-0270656

    Code Inist : 002B16N. Création : 16/11/1999.