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  1. Alcohol-related road traffic injuries in Eldoret, Kenya.

    Article - En anglais

    Objective 

    To establish the extent of alcohol involvement in motor vehicle crashes occurring in Eldoret in western Kenya.

    Design 

    A descriptive hospital-based study.

    Setting and subjects 

    Crash-involved patients aged 16 years and above presenting for treatment in all hospitals located in Eldoret town over a period of six months.

    Methods 

    Casualties were enrolled consecutively.

    A questionnaire eliciting demographics and crash circumstances was administered.

    Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was evaluated either by breath tests or venous blood sample analysis in consenting casualties presenting within 10 hours of the crash.

    BAC levels of 5 mg% and greater were taken as a positive test ; patients registering BAC levels equal to or greater than 50 mg% were considered as being intoxicated.

    Results 

    Of the 188 patients evaluated, 23.4% were BAC positive and 12.2% were intoxicated.

    Males were twice as likely as females to have been drinking prior to the crash (26.4% versus 13.6% ; p=0.08).

    Significantly greater proportions of night-time and weekend crashes involved intoxicated subjects (p=0.02 and p=0.03, respectively).

    Motor vehicle drivers were the most affected by alcohol (60%), whereas pedestrians (33.3%), passengers (16%) and pedal cyclists (8.3%) were involved to a lesser extent.

    In comparison to passengers, drivers were eight times more likely to have been drinking (OR=7.9, p=0.04). (...)

    Mots-clés Pascal : Accident circulation, Facteur risque, Alcool, Véhicule à moteur, Prévalence, Alcoolisme, Epidémiologie, Kenya, Afrique

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : Traffic accident, Risk factor, Alcohol, Motor vehicle, Prevalence, Alcoholism, Epidemiology, Kenya, Africa

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 99-0223162

    Code Inist : 002B03F. Création : 16/11/1999.