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  1. Nematode intestinal parasites of children in rural Guinea, Africa : prevalence and relationship to geophagia.

    Article - En anglais

    Background Intestinal parasitism is common among children in developing countries, but the risk factors for infection are not well characterized.

    Methods A stool examination was performed on 286 randomly selected children aged 1-18 years from three rural villages in Guinea, Africa.

    Information collected by questionnaire was used to examine the relationship between geophagia and infection with intestinal nematodes acquired by ingestion versus skin penetration.

    Results Fifty-three per cent of children were infected by at least one type of soil-transmitted nematode.

    Geophagia was reported by parents to occur in 57%, 53%, and 43%, of children ages 1-5,6-10, and 11-18 years, respectively.

    The pattern of geophagia by age and gender of the children more closely resembled the infection pattern for the two orally acquired and soil-transmitted nematodes (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura) than it did the infection pattern for the two soil-transmitted nematodes that infect by skin penetration (hookworm, Strongyloides stercoralis).

    Conclusions These findings demonstrate that geophagia is an important risk factor for orally acquired nematode infections in African children.

    Education regarding geophagia prevention should be an integral component of any soil-transmitted parasite control programme.

    Mots-clés Pascal : Parasitose, Infection, Intestin pathologie, Ascaris lumbricoides, Nematoda, Nemathelminthia, Helmintha, Invertebrata, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis, Géophagie, Ankylostomiase, Nématodose, Helminthiase, Etat nutritionnel, Epidémiologie, Prévalence, Facteur risque, Enfant, Homme, Guinée, Afrique, Appareil digestif pathologie

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : Parasitosis, Infection, Intestinal disease, Ascaris lumbricoides, Nematoda, Nemathelminthia, Helmintha, Invertebrata, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis, Geophagia, Hookworm infection, Nematode disease, Helminthiasis, Nutritional status, Epidemiology, Prevalence, Risk factor, Child, Human, Guinea, Africa, Digestive diseases

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 99-0147640

    Code Inist : 002B05E03B3. Création : 16/11/1999.