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  1. Hierarchies and cliques in the social networks of health care professionals : implications for the design of dissemination strategies.

    Article - En anglais

    Interest in how best to influence the behaviour of clinicians in the interests of both clinical and cost effectiveness has rekindled concern with the social networks of health care professionals.

    Ever since the seminal work of Coleman et al. [Coleman.

    J.S., Katz.

    E., Menzel.

    H. 1966.

    Mcdical Innovation : A Diffusion Study.

    Bobbs-Merrill.

    Indianapolis.]. networks have been seen as important in the process by which clinicians adopt (or fail to adopt) new innovations in clinical practice.

    Yet very little is actually known about the social networks of clinicians in modern health care settings.

    This paper describes the professional social networks of two groups of health care professionals, clinical directors of medicine and directors of nursing, in hospitals in England.

    We focus on network density, centrality and centralisation because these characteristics have been linked to access to information, social influence and social control processes.

    The results show that directors of nursing are more central to their networks than clinical directors of medicine and that their networks are more hierarchical.

    Clinical directors of medicine tend to be embedded in much more densely connected networks which we describe as cliques. (...)

    Mots-clés Pascal : Personnel sanitaire, Médecin, Infirmier, Pratique professionnelle, Comportement, Réseau social, Hiérarchie, Groupe social, Information, Influence, Aspect social, Psychométrie, Homme

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : Health staff, Physician, Nurse, Professional practice, Behavior, Social network, Hierarchy, Social group, Information, Influence, Social aspect, Psychometrics, Human

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 99-0115041

    Code Inist : 002B30A05. Création : 16/11/1999.