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  1. The relation of Physical activity to risk for symptomatic Gallstone disease in men.

    Article - En anglais

    Background 

    Gallstone disease is a major source of morbidity in the United States.

    Gallstones are twice as common in women as in men, but severe biliary events leading to surgery occur with equal frequency in the two sexes.

    Objective 

    To determine whether physical activity decreases risk for symptomatic gallstone disease in men.

    Design 

    Prospective cohort study.

    Setting 

    U.S. male health professionals.

    Patients 

    45 813 men 40 to 75 years of age were followed from 1986 to 1994.

    Measurements 

    Questionnaires mailed in 1986,1988,1990,1992, and 1994 asked about physical activity, incidence of gallstone disease, age, body weight, dietary and alcohol intake, smoking habits, use of medications, and occurrence of diagnosed medical conditions other than gallstone disease.

    Results 

    828 men reported having newly symptomatic gallstones (diagnosed by ultrasonography or radiography) or undergoing cholecystectomy for recent symptoms.

    After adjustment for multiple confounders, increased physical activity was inversely related to risk for symptomatic gallstone disease.

    When extreme quintiles were compared, men younger than 65 years of age had a stronger inverse association (multivariate relative risk, 0.58 [95% Cl, 0.44 to 0.78]) with risk than did men 65 years of age or older (relative risk, 0.75 [Cl, 0.52 to 1.09]). In contrast, sedentary behavior was positively related to risk for symptomatic gallstone disease. (...)

    Mots-clés Pascal : Lithiase, Voie biliaire, Incidence, Exercice physique, Enquête par correspondance, Facteur risque, Etude cohorte, Evaluation, Homme, Voie biliaire pathologie, Appareil digestif pathologie, Sport, Athlétisme, Education santé

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : Lithiasis, Biliary tract, Incidence, Physical exercise, Mail inquiry, Risk factor, Cohort study, Evaluation, Human, Biliary tract disease, Digestive diseases, Sport, Athletics, Health education

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 98-0177339

    Code Inist : 002B13C03. Création : 11/09/1998.