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  1. Who misses out with school-based health programmes ? A study of schistosomiasis control in Egypt.

    Article - En anglais

    There has been a recent revival of interest in school-based health programmes in developing countries as a means of reducing the morbidity observed in school-aged children, of improving their physical growth and cognitive development, and of controlling transmission of disease in the community at large.

    This study used data collected from a large epidemiological survey of schistosomiasis in Egypt to examine what proportion of infected children missed treatment from an established national school-based schistosomiasis control programme simply because they did not attend school.

    It showed that children who were not enrolled in school had a higher prevalence of infection and were more intensely infected than children who attended school.

    At the extreme, over 80% of infected girls in one part of Egypt could not be treated by the existing school programme because they did not attend school.

    If these trends are similar in other countries where school-based programmes are being developed, school-based delivery may exacerbate existing inequalities in society and ways of expanding services to children who do not attend school regularly need to be explored.

    Mots-clés Pascal : Schistosomiase, Trématodose, Helminthiase, Parasitose, Infection, Schistosoma mansoni, Trematoda, Plathelmintha, Helmintha, Invertebrata, Schistosoma haematobium, Lutte sanitaire, Egypte, Afrique, Enfant, Homme, Programme sanitaire

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : Schistosomiasis, Trematode disease, Helminthiasis, Parasitosis, Infection, Schistosoma mansoni, Trematoda, Plathelmintha, Helmintha, Invertebrata, Schistosoma haematobium, Sanitary control, Egypt, Africa, Child, Human, Sanitary program

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 96-0422239

    Code Inist : 002B05E03C1. Création : 10/04/1997.