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  1. Assessment of stress and coping levels among physicians at King Khalid University Hospital.

    Article - En anglais

    Abstract Design and objective 

    A cross sectional study was conducted among physicians at King Khalid University Hospital during the period from 17th July 1993 until 13th November 1993, to study the phenomenon of burnout and stress as well as coping levels among them.

    Intervention 

    A self administered questionnaire was distributed to all actively practicing physicians in different disciplines of medicine.

    Results 

    One hundred and sixty-three questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 52.8%. Of the total, two thirds of the participants were males with a mean age of 38.3 ± 7.1 and 62% of them were Saudis.

    There were 66 (40.6%) academic physicians.

    The commonest source of stress was night calls (78.5) and the least was fear of contagion and worry regarding illness (19%). Of the examined group only 3 (1.9%) physicians were at risk of developing burnout.

    Analysis of the stress levels showed that 77.2% of the physicians were at level of healthy stress, with predominance of males (p<0.05).

    Approximately 21% of the recruited physicians were at the level of « stress to the limit » and only 1.8% were at a distress or impairment level.

    When coping was examined, it was found that 58.6% had healthy coping, 12.3% had noneffective coping, and 1.2% had maladaptive coping.

    Conclusion 

    The presented study revealed that the burnout phenomenon exists among King Khalid University Hospital physicians, but it is not significantly high. (...)

    Mots-clés Pascal : Evaluation, Stress, Profession, Médecin, Questionnaire, Homme, Arabie Saoudite, Asie

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : Evaluation, Stress, Profession, Physician, Questionnaire, Human, Saudi Arabia, Asia

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 96-0351618

    Code Inist : 002B30A05. Création : 10/04/1997.