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  1. Drinking by police officers, general drivers and late-night drivers.

    Article - En anglais

    Objective 

    This study compares police officers'reported alcohol use with similar reports from age-and gender-matched samples from the general driving population (GDP) and drivers recruited at highrisk hours who are most likely to drink and drive (roadside drivers).

    Method 

    Data were derived from interviews with 239 police officers who spent at least 5% of their time on alcohol or traffic enforcement ; 243 subjects from the GDP, selected by random-digit dialing ; and 249 drivers recruited at roadside on Friday and Saturday nights between 10 :

    • Data were derived from interviews with 239 police officers who spent at least 5% of their time on alcohol or traffic enforcement ;

    • 243 subjects from the GDP, selected by random-digit dialing ;

    • 00 PM and 3 : 00 AM.

    Results 

    Officers report drinking less frequently and in smaller quantities than either of the driver samples.

    Differences between police and general drivers are modest : e.g., usual frequency of drinking (1 to<3 vs 3 or 4 times/month ; piota. 001) and number of days/average month with kappa2 drinks/day (mean=2.5epsilonrhô3.4zêta vs 4.9epsilonrhô6.5zêta ; p iota. 001).

    There are greater differences between police officers and roadside drivers : e.g., 14.2% and 2.4%, respectively, abstain (vs 15.6% of general drivers ; police vs general drivers, Ns ; police and general drivers vs roadside drivers, p iota. 001).

    Conclusions 

    The data suggest that officers'drinking differs significantly from that of drivers most likely to be driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI).

    If this is so, police training programs pertaining to DUI and other alcohol-related offenses should pay explicit attention to the...

    Mots-clés Pascal : Consommation, Boisson alcoolisée, Policier, Enquête, Etats Unis, Amérique du Nord, Amérique, Etude comparative, Conducteur véhicule, Efficacité, Programme sanitaire, Education sanitaire, Prévention, Santé publique, Homme

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : Consumption, Alcoholic beverage, Policeman, Inquiry, United States, North America, America, Comparative study, Vehicle driver, Efficiency, Sanitary program, Health education, Prevention, Human

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 96-0177519

    Code Inist : 002B18C05B. Création : 199608.