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  1. Are radiologic changes in the thoracic and lumbar spine of adolescents risk factors for low back pain in adults : a 25-year prospective cohort study of 640 school children.

    Article - En anglais

    Study Design

    This report was based on a 25-year prospective cohort study and designed as a self-administered questionnaire with low back pain as the main topic.

    Objective

    To identify whether radiologic changes in the thoracic and lumbar spine and a history of low back pain in the adolescent period represent risk factors for low back pain in adults.

    Summary of Background Data

    Six-hundred-forty 14-year-old school children were examined with x-rays of the thoracic and lumbar spine and registered by the school doctor regarding a history of low back pain.

    Methods

    All of the x-rays and the short journals from the school doctor's registration were reviewed.

    This primary information was the basis of the investigation 25 years later.

    Results

    Eleven percent of the cohort had a history of low back pain in adolescence, and the results showed an 84% lifetime prevalence of low back pain in these subjects as adults and an increased frequency of low back pain the last month and week before they answered the questionnaire, compared with the rest of the cohort.

    These problems were associated with increased morbidity and decreased working capacity.

    Thirteen percent had radiologic abnormalities, mainly Scheuermann changes, in the thoracic and lumbar spine as adolescents, with no positive correlation to low back pain in this period.

    Conclusion

    This study suggests that low back pain in the growth period is « a real problem, » with a trend toward aggravation as time passes.

    Mots-clés Pascal : Douleur, Lombalgie, Chronique, Rachis pathologie, Système ostéoarticulaire pathologie, Rachis dorsal, Rachis lombaire, Epidémiologie, Facteur risque, Adolescent, Homme, Radiodiagnostic, Radiographie, Etude cohorte, Signe radiologique

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : Pain, Low back pain, Chronic, Spine disease, Diseases of the osteoarticular system, Dorsal spine, Lumbar spine, Epidemiology, Risk factor, Adolescent, Human, Radiodiagnosis, Radiography, Cohort study, Radiologic sign

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 96-0032466

    Code Inist : 002B15F. Création : 01/03/1996.