logo BDSP

Base documentaire


  1. Trends in renal disease morbidity and mortality in the United States, 1979 to 1990.

    Article - En anglais

    Four indices of morbidity and mortality due to seven groups of renal diseases are evaluated in the United States for the period 1979 through 1990.

    These indices include mortality, hospitalization, doctor's office visits, and prevalence.

    Age-adjusted and age-specific rates are calculated.

    Estimates are provided for racial-ethnic-and gender-specific subpopulations.

    The burden of some diseases had decreased, especially renal infections.

    Most indices of the burden of diabetes with renal involvement and hypertensive renal disease have increased, especially among segments of the population that are growing.

    For many groups of disorders examined, men have experienced an increasing burden of disease over the 12 years evaluated.

    These data support current trends in renal failure and serve to generate hypotheses regarding renal disease patterns.

    The magnitude of the burden of renal disease and the trends toward increasing rates indicate that renal disease is a large and growing clinical and public health problem.

    Major improvements are needed in the range and accuracy of diagnosis and of reporting renal-related conditions, and additional resources need to be brought to the problem of renal-related morbidity.

    This is a US government work.

    There are no restrictions on its use.

    Mots-clés Pascal : Rein pathologie, Epidémiologie, Etats Unis, Amérique du Nord, Amérique, Mortalité, Morbidité, Facteur risque, Homme, Age, Etude statistique, Appareil urinaire pathologie

    Mots-clés Pascal anglais : Renal disease, Epidemiology, United States, North America, America, Mortality, Morbidity, Risk factor, Human, Age, Statistical study, Urinary system disease

    Logo du centre Notice produite par :
    Inist-CNRS - Institut de l'Information Scientifique et Technique

    Cote : 95-0542827

    Code Inist : 002B14E01. Création : 01/03/1996.